Steve Poltz

 

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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Some people start life with a plan. Not Steve. He opens himself up to the universe in a way most of us will never be loose enough to achieve, and the universe responds with a wink, a seemingly bottomless well of inspiration, and the talent to truly connect with an audience. While 2021 could have found him adrift, faced with a tour moratorium the likes of which he hadn’t experienced in decades, it opened a door — literally, his friend Oliver Wood of The Wood Brother’s door — to creating an exuberant, thoughtful batch of songs that celebrate life in all of its stages.

The resulting album is called Stardust & Satellites [Red House / Compass Records].

“I just make stuff up,” he exclaims, quipping, “it sounded good to say that.” Steve is the sort of prolific writer and collaborator who downplays what seems like a non-stop geyser of creativity. “I have no rhyme or reason for what I do. It’s all magic. I go by instinct. It just felt right, so I went with it.”

The “it” in question is one of those serendipitous situations that were created by the pandemic. Steve, a road dog and performance junkie who regularly spends 300+ days a year on the road, bringing it to the people, should’ve been on tour last year. Esteemed Nashville roots rockers The Wood Brothers (Chris Wood being a former neighbor to Steve), also should’ve been on tour. Stuck in Nashville, Steve often joined the Wood Brothers for outdoor socially distant hangs, and, on a whim, decided to record one song with Oliver Wood and Jano Rix.

They cut “Frenemy,” a wistful, “keep your friends close and your enemies even closer” song that made it clear to all involved that they’d stumbled onto something special. With no studio clock ticking, no schedule or deadlines to meet, the companionship and ability to collaborate with like-minded musicians added a joyful diversion to what was a boring-ass year. Musically, the sky was the limit, and the group of musicians and friends embarked on a musical experience that found cast and crew reaching toward the stratosphere with Stardust & Satellites, which Oliver and Jano Rix of The Wood Brothers produced.

The album begins with the lithe fingerpicking of “Wrong Town,” an anthem summing up the life of an itinerant songwriter/performer, where he declares, “The truth is I have no plan at all,” going on to cite Emmylou Harris and Don Was as his style icons. It’s a “pleased to meet me” sort of song, and it was written to greet the audience at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival in 2019. “I wanted to write an opening song,” Steve recalls.“I sat down with fellow Nashville songwriter Anthony da Costa, and ‘Wrong Town’ just appeared.”

But even gonzo guys have their moments where the cycle of life seems to be almost too much to bear. “Conveyor Belt” is a heartfelt song, a song that could only be written at a certain point in one’s life, and that point is when you’re saying goodbye to your parents and addressing your own mortality. Steve explains, “My mom passed away, and then a few years later my dad crossed over. I started thinking that I was next on the conveyor belt in a factory on the wheel of time. Next thing I know, I grabbed my guitar and this song appeared to me like a gift. It didn’t exist and then voila, there it was. I feel lucky to be a conduit.”

The song is written over a gentle, repetitive melody that moves along with the inevitability of ye old sands of time. For fans, it’s a different side of Steve, using a voice and a new solemnity for a song that touches a universal nerve.

On one of the last nights of the recording sessions, Steve locked himself up in his writing room and within an hour, had conjured the catchy, effervescent “Can O’ Pop,” destined to be the radio single.

“Jano from The Wood Brothers was leaving the studio, and I asked him to give me a beat, and I told him I’d write a song with the beat he gave me,” recalls Steve. The exuberant, syncopated groove seems to bubble up as Steve admits, in his best mid-period Dylan, “I want to feel the fizzy rhythm with you.”

“Hey, Everyone loves a can of pop” he cracks.

Among other highlights, “It’s Baseball Season” seesaws on a sunny acoustic guitar as he pays homage to America’s favorite pastime. Poltz is a true fan, and the song’s laid-back, relaxed vibe speaks of carefree days at the ballpark. Steve even pays tribute to legendary baseball announcer Ernie Harwell.

With a cult following that includes fellow musicians, regular folks and festival goers who stumble onto his performances, there’s no common denominator to Steve’s fans. Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia and raised in San Diego, CA Steve toured and recorded with San Diego cult favorites The Rugburns (they still play annual sold-out reunion shows). But it was through his creative partnership with Jewel that he vaulted into the national spotlight; co-writing her multiplatinum Billboard Hot 100-busting smash, “You Were Meant For Me,” and continues to work with her to this day.

Over the years, the Nashville-based troubadour has built a fascinating solo catalog, earmarked by his debut, One Left Shoe, Dreamhouse, Folk Singer, and 2019’s Shine On. No Depression crowned him, “A sardonic provocateur with a lighthearted acoustic-driven wit, suggesting at times a sunnier, less psychedelic Todd Snider, or maybe a less wan, washed Jackson Brown,” while the Associated Press dubbed him “part busker, part Iggy Pop and part Robin Williams, a freewheeling folkie with a quick wit and big heart.”

Among other collaborations, GRAMMY-winning bluegrass phenom Billy Strings tapped him to co-write “Leaders” on 2021’s Renewal and he’s co-written with Molly Tuttle, Sierra Hull, Nicki Bluhm, Oliver Wood and even Mojo Nixon.

He’s resumed his tour schedule, and when he comes to your town, he’ll say, as he does every night, “This is the best show I’ve ever played.” And hell, maybe it just is.

Ultimately, Steve never needed a plan.
He’s something of a natural, after all.

Starcrawler

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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“Starcrawler are a rock band for a new generation. Best known for their explosive live shows, the 5-piece band consists of full-throttle frontwoman Arrow De Wilde, guitarist Henri Cash and brother Bill Cash on pedal steel/guitar, drummer Seth Carolina, and bassist Tim Franco. With two studio albums under their belts, their upward trajectory continues to roll full steam ahead in 2022 with the release of their brand-new single, “Roadkill.” Fully leaning into their own epic vision of a contemporary Hollywood Babylon, they’ve morphed into a modern day take on LA legends X, with a sprinkle of The Go-Go’s, a smattering of The Distillers and some Rolling Stones sleaze thrown in for good measure. Since their early days, Starcrawler have won the love of such legendary artists as Shirley Manson, Elton John, Iggy Pop, Jack White, Dave Grohl, and more all while opening for the likes of Jack White and My Chemical Romance, and previous support slots with luminaries such as Beck, Foo Fighters and Spoon among others. Now embarking on a new ‘era’, Los Angeles’ most thrilling rock’n’roll collective are as raw and hungry as ever, but refined, refreshed and ready to take on whatever’s thrown at them.”

Drug Church

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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Drug Church are a glorious contradiction. They’re an unabashedly aggressive band that writes hooks you can’t stop humming–too poppy for the heavy crowd, too heavy for the poppy crowd. Their frontman is a singer who rarely sings, delivering lyrics that revel in the darkest corners of the human condition but are just as likely to make you laugh as to make you flinch. The band loudly shouts uncomfortable truths we’d prefer to avoid but makes us want to shout along with them; they make serious music but don’t take themselves too seriously; they’re completely adverse to planning but have found accidental success. Now on their third full-length, Cheer, the band has doubled down on their Drug Church-iest impulses and somehow emerged with their most accessible album to date.

Over six years, several EPs, and two full-lengths, Drug Church–Patrick Kindlon (vocals), Nick Cogan (guitar), Cory Galusha (guitar), Pat Wynne (bass), and Chris Villeneuve (drums)–have earned a cult following by making outsider music that’s as thoughtful as it is hard hitting. Their sound is a crushing mix of hardcore energy, ‘90s alternative melodicism, and Kindlon’s signature sing-shout; if that doesn’t exactly fit into a convenient box, it’s because the most intentional thing about Drug Church is knowing the value of being unintentional. Kindlon says, “If I have any success I’d like it to be just because people like the thing, not because I sat in a dark room learning brand alchemy.”

Deerhoof

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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One of the most acclaimed acts of the early 21st century, Deerhoof mix vibrant melodies, noise, and an experimental spirit into utterly distinctive music. Their approach was so singular that they could explore any style or influence — from classic rock to classical music — and make it sound purely Deerhoof. Throughout their long and prolific career, they rarely repeated themselves. On 1997 debut The Man, The King, The Girl, their music was noisy and full of improvisation; on their next album, 1999’s Holdy Paws, it was controlled and direct. Deerhoof continued to deliver different sides of their music over the years, whether it was the ambitious sprawl of 2005’s The Runners Four or 2007’s compact Friend Opportunity, which nevertheless managed to touch on post-punk, jazz, and psych-rock. Their horizons only continued to broaden as they incorporated elements of Tropicalia and synth pop into 2011’s Deerhoof vs. Evil and riffed on surf, disco, and punk on 2014’s La Isla Bonita. However, Deerhoof’s creativity wasn’t limited to their music. They released a song as sheet music in 2008 (years before Beck and Blur embarked on like-minded projects), inspired a children’s ballet with their 2004 album Milk Man, and performed at the Large Hadron Collider. As their 25th anniversary neared, Deerhoof’s long-standing dedication to social justice came to the fore, and with 2020’s searching Future Teenage Cave Artists and the following year’s optimistic Actually, You Can, they continued to inspire and surprise listeners in their own inimitable way.

Deerhoof began in 1994 as an improvisational project for guitarist Rob Fisk, with drummer/keyboardist Greg Saunier joining him a week later. After performing at that year’s Yoyo A Go Go festival, the duo signed to Kill Rock Stars, which issued the 7″ “Return of the Woods M’Lady” in March 1995. Early releases such as this and For Those of Us on Foot had a harsher, no wave-inspired sound than Deerhoof’s later efforts, though they also hinted at the playfulness that would soon surface in their music. In mid-1995, Fisk and Saunier were joined by vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Satomi Matsuzaki, who became a member of Deerhoof soon after moving to San Francisco from Japan and had never been in a band before. Matsuzaki appeared on1996’s self-titled double 7″ on Menlo Park, but other members passed through Deerhoof during this time, including Chris Cooper of Angst Hase Pfeffer Nase. Arriving in October 1997, Deerhoof’s debut album The Man, The King, The Girl, found the band making their own kind of pop songs, which incorporated toy instruments and highlighted Matsuzaki’s clear yet unpredictable vocal melodies. The “Come See the Duck” 7″ arrived on Banano a year later.

Fisk left Deerhoof after 1999’s Holdy Paws, an experiment that found the band stripping away much of the improvisation and noise from their music. Late that year, former Gorge Trio guitarist John Dieterich became the band’s new guitarist. The live album Koalamagic appeared on the Australian label Dual Plover in 2000. During this time, Saunier and Matsuzaki completed sessions recorded before Fisk departed that became Halfbird, which Menlo Park issued in July 2001. That year the group also released the “My Pal Foot Foot” 7″, a cover of the legendary Shaggs song that also appeared on the Better Than the Beatles tribute. The first album to include Dieterich, June 2002’s kaleidoscopic Reveille, became Deerhoof’s critical breakthrough, winning them acclaim for its wide-ranging sounds and engaging melodies.

By the time of Reveille’s release, guitarist Chris Cohen had joined the band. He made his recorded debut with the following year’s Apple O’, which unlike Reveille, came together quickly, with most of the album recorded in a single nine-hour session with engineer Jay Pellicci. Like its predecessor, Apple O’ earned significant praise, and the members of Deerhoof quit their day jobs to focus on the band and touring. Also in 2003, the band appeared on Azadi! A Benefit Compilation for the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, while Saunier collaborated with Hella‘s Zach Hill and Joanna Newsom as Nervous Cop, who issued their self-titled debut album in November.

Deerhoof returned in March 2004 with Milk Man, a concept album inspired by the illustrations of Ken Kagami as well as Broadway, Igor Stravinsky, and prog rock. That April, the band played the All Tomorrow’s Parties festival curated by Sonic Youth and Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks. On the following year’s mini-album Green Cosmos — the first Deerhoof release sung in Japanese — the band underscored its classical and electronic influences. To make their seventh album, Deerhoof spent months working in an Oakland, California rehearsal space. The results were October’s ambitious The Runners Four, another conceptual effort that found the band trading vocal and instrumental duties over its sprawling length.

The following year was another busy one for the band: not only did they tour with the Flaming Lipsthe Fiery Furnaces, and Mary Timony, among others, they also featured on Danielson‘s album Ships and performed an original score to Harry Smith’s acclaimed animated film Heaven and Earth Magic at the San Francisco International Film Festival. Following this performance, Cohen amicably parted ways with the band, and Deerhoof posted an EP of free music on their website in his honor. Continuing on as a trio, Saunier, Matsuzaki, and Dieterich began work on their next album, toured extensively, and collaborated with composer Ed Shearmur on the music for Dedication, a film directed by Justin Theroux. Later that year, a children’s ballet based on Milk Man was performed in North Haven, Maine. January 2007 saw the release of Friend Opportunity, a polished, concise yet eclectic set of songs.

Following a world tour that saw the band play New York’s Highline Festival at David Bowie‘s invitation, Deerhoof added guitarist Ed Rodriguez (also of Gorge TrioXBXRX, and the Flying Luttenbachers) to the fold in early 2008. That year, the band released sheet music for “Fresh Born,” a song off their upcoming album, so that fans could record and share their own versions of it. Arriving in October 2008, Offend Maggie echoed the expansive style of The Runners Four while returning to the dual guitar attack of the band’s earlier albums. Deerhoof’s live performances from this time found them performing with luminaries ranging from Wadada Leo Smith to LiLiPUT’s Marlene Marder. The following year, the band appeared in Adam Pendleton’s film BAND as the Rolling Stones and contributed the song “I Did Crimes for You” to its soundtrack.

Along with performing Joy Division‘s Unknown Pleasures with their friends Xiu Xiu in Australia and Brooklyn, Deerhoof spent much of 2010 working on their next album. Months ahead of the album’s release, the band leaked songs to different media outlets, creating a virtual musical scavenger hunt that culminated with the arrival of their tenth studio album. Their first full-length for Polyvinyl, January 2011’s Deerhoof vs. Evil incorporated synth pop, Tropicalia, the Beach Boys, and more into its chameleonic sound. Deerhoof complemented the album with a series of 7″s that featured Wilco‘s Jeff TweedyDavid Bazan, and Busdriver performing their own lyrics to various Deerhoof vs. Evil tracks. The year’s other projects included a track for Polyvinyl’s benefit compilation Japan 3.11.11, which provided aid to the country in the wake of its devastating earthquake and tsunami, and the collaboration Congotronics vs. Rockers, a touring group that also counted Juana MolinaKonono No. 1, and Kasai Allstars among its lineup.

By the time Deerhoof were ready to record their 11th album, the bandmembers lived in four different cities. Collaborating via email, they made September 2012’s Breakup Song, which took an empowering and positive approach toward songs about falling out of love. The following month saw the release of “Sexy, but Sparkly,” a track they recorded for the documentary series Masters from Their Day with Chris Shaw; it was the first time in their history that they worked with an outside producer. In March 2013, Chicago’s 22-piece contemporary classical music group Ensemble Dal Niente premiered their piece “Deerhoof Chamber Variations,” which interpreted songs from throughout the band’s body of work, at New York’s Ecstatic Music Festival.

For 2014’s La Isla Bonita, Deerhoof’s members convened at Rodriguez’s house and recorded songs inspired by the Ramones and Madonna in just a week. The following year, they became the first band to perform an improvised set at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and appeared on 50 Bands & a Cat for Indiana Equality, a compilation to benefit Indiana’s LGBTQ community released by Joyful Noise. Also in 2015, Deerhoof released the live album Fever 121614, which captured a Tokyo date on the La Isla Bonita tour. Early in 2016, the band teamed up with composer Marcos Balter and Ensemble Dal Niente for Balter/Saunier, a collaboration that featured a medley of Deerhoof songs arranged for the ensemble. That June, Deerhoof released The Magic, an uninhibited set of songs featuring three unused tracks written and recorded for the HBO series Vinyl. As Joyful Noise‘s Artist in Residence for 2017, Deerhoof issued a number of limited-edition releases and the politically informed Mountain Moves. Arriving in September 2017, the album was a call to resistance that featured collaborations with artists including Laetitia SadierWye Oak‘s Jenn Wasner, and Juana Molina, and covers of songs by the Staple Singers and Bob Marley. To commemorate their 25th anniversary in 2019, Deerhoof released remastered reissues of The Man, The King, The Girl, Holdy Paws, and Halfbird. They returned with new music in May 2020 with Future Teenage Cave Artists, a darker — but still hopeful — meditation on the era’s political crises that featured some of Deerhoof’s most overtly challenging music in some time. That September, they released Love-Lore, a 35-minute medley of 43 songs including pieces by Ornette ColemanEnnio MorriconeEddy Grant, and B-52s that they first performed at the 2019 Time:Spans Festival. Deerhoof borrowed some of that album’s eclecticism — as well as the spontaneous feel of their concerts — for October 2021’s Actually, You Can, which folded Baroque, Tejano, and Japanese festival music influences into its cheerfully subversive songs.

Boundaries

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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Connecticut metalcore wrecking crew Boundaries are following 2019’s killer My Body In Bloom EP with their first full-length album, Your Receding Warmth, on November 13 via Unbeaten Records (pre-order). The album was recorded with producer Randy LeBoeuf (who’s also worked with Every Time I Die, The Acacia Strain, and produced the anticipated new Chamber album), and Randy’s crisp, gut-punching production is perfect for Boundaries’ sound.

The first single is “Carve,” which starts out as bone-crushing metalcore, but there’s more to this song than just straight-up mosh fuel. It’s got a soaring post-metal mid-section and there’s genuine emotion in Matt McDougal’s voice. If you dig Knocked Loose (who Boundaries have opened for) or Chamber or Sanction or other current bands in that realm, you don’t wanna sleep on this. — Brooklyn Vegan

10 Years

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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For nearly two decades, 10 Years have quietly pushed themselves and modern rock towards evolution. Building a formidable catalog, the group’s gold-selling 2005 breakthrough The Autumn Effect yielded the hit “Wasteland,” which went gold, infiltrated the Billboard Hot 100, and clinched #1 at Active Rock Radio and #1 on the Billboard Alternative Songs Chart. They landed three Top 30 entries on the Billboard Top 200 with Division [2008], Feeding the Wolves [2010], and Minus the Machine [2012]. Most recently, 2017’s (How to Live) As Ghosts marked a reunion between Jesse, Brian, and Matt and achieved marked success. Not only did the album bow in the Top 5 of the US Top Hard Rock Albums Chart, but it also yielded the hit “Novacaine.” The single ascended to the Top 5 of the Billboard US Mainstream Rock Songs Chart and tallied 16 million Spotify streams, alongside 29 million streams across all dsp’s. The cumulative total for all track streams from repertoire on How To Live (As Ghosts) exceeds 51 million plays. Along the way, they sold out countless headline shows and toured with everyone from Korn, Deftones, and Stone Sour to Chris Cornell and Linkin Park. The new album, Violent Allies, is a collaboration with GRAMMY® Award-winning producer and Feeding the Wolves collaborator Howard Benson [My Chemical Romance, Halestorm, Papa Roach, Three Days Grace].

HEALTH

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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The last two years changed music for everyone. They might have changed HEALTH for the better.

 

Three years after VOL.4 :: SLAVES OF FEAR, the L.A. trio’s ferocious entry into the world of heavy music, HEALTH return with the second half of their DISCO4 series. On the first installment in 2020, they swapped remixes for original collaborations with Perturbator, 100 Gecs and JPEGMAFIA.

 

A whole lot went to hell in the meantime, forcing the band to re-invent how they wrote music together. For DISCO4 :: PART II they cut it fast and mean, recruiting both legends and nascent contenders of heavy music and its many peripheral genres.

 

The centerpiece of DISCO4 :: Part II is the Nine Inch Nails collaboration “ISN’T EVERYONE,” which re-unites HEALTH with their early-career arena tourmates. The mesh between Trent Reznor’s growls and Jake Duzsik’s gossamer melodies—all over a gigantic synth barrage—feels like a new moment in industrial music.

 

On “COLD BLOOD,” their latest single with metal titans Lamb of God, HEALTH show they can devote themselves to a genre and detonate it all in the same track. Its blistering heaviness juxtaposed against album cuts like the raucous “GNOSTIC FLESH/MORTAL HELL” (with noise-rap banshee Backxwash and the virtuosically scabrous trio Ho99o9) or the contemplative “STILL BREATHING” (co-piloted with teenage post-punk experimentalist Ekkstacy), demonstrates the breadth of HEALTH’s sonic palette and ability to incorporate what heavy music looks like today and going forward.

 

From their twitchy 2007 debut, through the groundbreaking 2012 score for Rockstar Games’ Max Payne 3 and 2015’s DEATH MAGIC, multi-instrumentalists/producers Jacob Duzsik and John Famiglietti, and drummer Benjamin Miller, snuck beauty and rigor into blinding noise. They draped moody violence over trap beats and warehouse rave sounds alike.

 

HEALTH are not only making the heaviest, most genre-obliterating music of their career. They’re documenting just how insane it feels to be alive right now.

 

Kishi Bashi – 151A 10th Anniversary Tour

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Masks are highly encouraged for all patrons while attending this event unless actively enjoying a beverage. Additionally, Proof of full COVID-19 vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test result within 48-72 hours will also be required.

We cannot accept all at-home tests. If it’s an at-home test that gives results via an app (which includes your information) those are acceptable. The test result will need to include your name and date of birth, and also have a time stamp so we can determine when the test was taken. It will be compared to your photo ID at the door.

***Visiting artists and productions may elect to follow increased health and safety protocols. Therefore, vaccinations, specific capacity, distancing, and face-covering protocols may vary from show to show***

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They say that you spend your entire life writing your first album, piecing every formative moment, scribbled turn of phrase, and thematic epiphany into a fantastical collage. Multi-instrumentalist K. Ishibashi (aka Kishi Bashi) disproves that old adage. The title of Kishi Bashi’s 2011 debut album, 151a, is a riff on the Japanese phrase “ichi-go ichi-e,” roughly translating to “one time, one place.” That’s exactly what this debut is: A singular time, an inimitable place, a launchpad for bigger and better things to come.

“It’s a play on words that translates as a performance aesthetic of having a unique performance in time, with imperfections, and enjoying it while you can,” Ishibashi told NPR at the time of the album’s release. “The saying reminds me to embrace my mistakes and move forward.”

Produced and performed exclusively by Kishi Bashi, 151a is a showcase of singular talent and ambition— and it didn’t go unnoticed by fans or peers. Along with launching Kishi Bashi’s career as a soloist, this earnest debut made him one of indie music’s most in-demand violinists. He was no longer relegated to side stage as a collaborator of Regina Spektor, Sondre Lerche, of Montreal, and more—the Kishi Bashi name could endure with its own merit.

As deeply personal as 151a undoubtedly is, the record was animated by a deep and enduring partnership. Following Kishi Bashi’s collaboration with of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes for the watershed art-pop album Paralytic Stalks, his worldview and artistic approach was transformed for the better. Strict habits hung loose, sonic palettes bled and broadened, and a one-man orchestra sprouted from a foundation of string loops.

From the deconstructed Beach Boys-esque doo-wop of “Wonder Woman” to the menacing marriage of Eastern Hues and Western operatics of “Beat the Bright out of Me,” 151a a mediation between opposing drives, offering possible reconciliation but never promising it. The album’s emotional wellspring, “I Am The Antichrist To You” was reimagined in 2021 when it was featured on the animated sci-fi sitcom Rick and Morty, introducing Kishi Bashi to a new generation of awestruck fans.

Kishi Bashi also uses 151a as a vehicle to explore his cultural background. Using Japanese refrains as a compositional and textural device (the polyrhythmic grandeur of “Bright Whites”; the gleeful surrealism of “It All Began With a Burst”), Kishi Bashi celebrates his heritage with earnestness. Japanese phrases and couplets are sung as the response to Kishi Bashi’s resplendent calls, offering listeners a conversation that dovetails with the album’s themes of love, sentimentality, and self-discovery.

Today, the “one time” and “one place” that 151a inhabited seems further than ever, almost broaching celestial realms of time and space. But, rest assured, with each listen, the world that Kishi Bashi built springs back to life. The world of 151a never left—it was just waiting to be rediscovered.

Ty Segall & Freedom Band

 

COVID PROTOCOLS: Until further notice, Ty Segall & Freedom Band’s show policy requires guests to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19.
Proof of vaccination may be given in the form of a paper copy or digital image of a guest’s vaccines card.
There will be a mask mandate indoors at all our shows. Negative PCR tests will not be acceptedat this time. Thank you.

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY

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One of the leaders of the new psych-influenced garage rock scene that erupted in California in the late 2000s, Ty Segall has produced a catalog as prolific as it is diverse. Working as a solo act and in a number of side projects, Segall has released literally dozens of albums since he left the Epsilons and cut his first project on his own in 2008. Depending on the album, Segall can sound raw (2016’s Emotional Mugger) or refined (2013’s Sleeper), and he’s capable of focused one-man-band efforts (2009’s Lemons) as well as sprawling and eclectic releases with a range of collaborators (2018’s Freedom’s Goblin). But Segall’s simple but strong melodic frameworks, his creative restlessness, and the infectious intensity of his instrumental work on guitar and keys are the constants in his ever-evolving discography.

Ty Segall first garnered public acclaim as the lead singer of Orange County, California garage rock revivalists the Epsilons. With that band, he practiced a rawer, snottier take on Strokes/Vines/White Stripes-style rock, occasionally delving into more retro territory. When that band splintered, he struck out on his own and started cranking out lo-fi albums, beginning with a self-titled effort on Castle Face in 2008. On his solo album Lemons, however, Segall delivered a much more traditional sound, studiously re-creating ’60s guitar tones and drenching his tracks in old-school reverb. The stomping results bore a striking resemblance to early garage masters such as the Sonics and the Standells, as well as proto-punks the Stooges and bedroom folk antecedent Alexander “Skip” Spence. He returned in 2010 with Melted.

The year 2011 was busy for him, with two albums — Live in Aisle Five and Goodbye Bread — scheduled for release, as well as an EP of T. Rex covers, Ty-Rex. Goodbye Bread marked a turn toward Segall’s softer side, evoking a John Lennon-like take on quieter and more introspective singer/songwriter fare. In 2012, Segall collaborated with Strange Boys‘ offshoot White Fence on Hair. This mini-album married Segall’s Beatles-soaked pop hooks and production with White Fence‘s Syd Barrett-influenced, acid-damaged garage sounds. Two more Segall albums followed that year, including June’s Slaughterhouse with the Ty Segall Band on In the Red, and Twins, the completely solo follow-up to Goodbye Bread released on Drag City in October.

Segall’s profile grew, and 2013 began with several reissues of previous projects, including a 2009 collaboration with Mikal Cronin entitled Reverse Shark Tank, as well as his earlier garage trio the Traditional Fools‘ out of print 2008 debut. In 2013, Segall also released the debut album from his side project Fuzz, in which he played drums rather than guitar. Also in 2013, he showed off a new approach, recording a departure from the usual and titling it Sleeper — all of the songs were acoustic ballads. Not one to rest on his laurels, Segall returned to the studio to record the 17-track follow-up Manipulator in 2014, released by Drag City in August. A live concert by the Ty Segall Band at the San Francisco club the Rickshaw Stop was released in February 2015 as part of the Live in San Francisco album series from Castle Face. Another live recording of Segall and his band, preserving his set at the 2013 Pickathon Festival, was released in May 2015 as a split album with the garage/psych act King Tuff, who were also taped at the same event. The year 2015 also saw the arrival of the second Fuzz album, and an expanded reissue of the Ty-Rex EP.

Segall kept up his usual frantic pace the next year, releasing the Emotional Mugger album in January, then touring behind it extensively. He also formed the band Gøggs, with Fuzz‘s Charles Moothart and Chris Shaw of Ex-Cult. They released a self-titled album in July. The next Ty Segall album was a self-titled effort in early 2017 on Drag City, recorded at Steve Albini‘s studio and featuring a full band that included longtime collaborator Mikal Cronin and the Cairo Gang‘s Emmett Kelly on guitar and vocals. Well received, the album reached number ten on Billboard’s Top Independent Albums chart. In early 2018, the prolific Segall brought out Freedom’s Goblin, a 19-song album that reunited him with AlbiniCronin, and Kelly, while expanding his sound with the use of a horn section, then released Joy a few months later — a collaboration with old running mate White Fence on a batch of off-kilter psych rock songs. In October 2018, Segall dropped Fudge Sandwich, in which he put his own unique spin on 11 cover tunes, interpreting artists ranging from Funkadelic to the Grateful Dead. The same month, he also brought out a low-key cassette-only release, Orange Rainbow, created in a run of just 55 copies for sale at a show of his visual art at a Los Angeles gallery. In January 2018, two live shows in Los Angeles on the tour supporting Freedom’s Goblin were recorded by Steve Albini. Highlights from the concerts were released in March 2019 on the album Deforming Lobes, credited to Ty Segall & Freedom Band. After indulgoing his rock side on most of his 2018 releases, Segall took a detour with First Taste, released in August 2019, which was more clearly informed by vintage pop and folk-rock sounds. ~ Pemberton Roach & Mark Deming, Rovi