Imarhan

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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In early 2019 the members of Imarhan began literally laying the groundwork for their third album. The Tuareg quintet was building a professional recording studio, the first ever in their home city of Tamanrasset in Southern Algeria, from the ground up. By March of 2020 the studio was filled with high-end audio gear otherwise inaccessible to the vast majority of musicians in much of the Saharan region. The group christened it Aboogi, named for the first semi-permanent structures their nomadic forebears built when establishing settlements and villages, and began tracking the first album they were able to record on their native soil. It seemed only natural to also call the resulting collection of songs Aboogi, a nod to the new collective space they had established, as well as the resilience of their culture and communities.

The diversity, beauty, and struggles of life in Tamanrasset are reflected in the songs on Aboogi. Following the exhilarating, eclectic Temet – which OkayAfrica declared “doesn’t just take the next step in Tuareg music; it sends it into hyperspace” – Imarhan has made an album that is as serene and open as the desert it emerged from. “Aboogi reflects the colors of Tamanrasset, what we experience in everyday life,” says bandleader Iyad Moussa Ben Abderahmane, aka Sadam. “We give space to the wind and the natural energies, to the sun and the sand. We want to express their colors through music.” There is incredible warmth embedded in these steady, lilting rhythms and patiently strummed acoustic guitars, derived not just from the natural environment but from the community that surrounds them. That warmth may come from the Saharan sun and those living under it, fostered by many generations of musicians that came before them, but it emanates outwards as Imarhan become leading ambassadors for their people and culture around the world.

As they have brought this music to new audiences in far-flung places, Imarhan’s musical community has also become global. Aboogi features Sudanese singer Sulafa Elyas, who contributes a gorgeous verse in Arabic on the mournful “Taghadart,” and Super Furry Animals’ Gruff Rhys sings of the value of kinship on “Adar Newlan” in his native Welsh. Their local Tamanrasset community joins in as well, including Tinarwen’s Abdallah Ag Alhousseyni and the poet Mohamed Ag Itlale, also known as Japonais, a pillar of the city’s artistic community who passed away shortly after these recordings were made. Imarhan’s musical world has always been expansive, based in the traditional sounds of the Tuareg people but fiercely individualistic and embracing of the many varied styles they encounter. On Aboogi they emerge as a truly global group, united with their collaborators in a spirit of resistance and social change.

Though the backbone of Imarhan’s music is based in the traditional rhythms and flourishes of Tamasheq wedding bands and the Assouf music pioneered by Tinariwen, Imarhan’s songs are thoroughly contemporary, bridging the past and future. On “Assossam” they sing together in one voice of the frustrations of the Tuareg people in post-colonial Southern Algeria, economically disenfranchised by their government as money and power are concentrated in Algiers two thousand miles to the north. “Adar Newlan” touches on the struggles of the young people of Tamanrasset: “The sons of my country are exhausted,” sings Sadam in Tamasheq, referencing oppressive laws that end up imprisoning many young men who are forced to work while struggling to simply survive. But still they draw on ancestral texts, such as on “Tindjatan,” which tells the story of a great defeat of a Tuareg community during a war before French colonization,

calling for bravery and solidarity, even in the face of ruin, as guitars trace circular patterns over insistent hand claps. “You must be in solidarity with your people at all costs, until the end,” says Sadam. This wisdom, like the music, becomes meaningful when passed down again and again, made new by each successive generation.

These may be heavy topics, but the featherweight, festive music on Aboogi belies its fierce sense of conviction and justice. Therein lie the complexities that make Imarhan’s music so prescient – beauty and tranquility intermingle with strife and heartache, creating a dynamic view of life for those subjugated by over a century of colonialism and lopsided revolutions but blessed with extraordinary community, art, and culture. With this album, and with the new studio that shares its name, Imarhan have opened their arms to those around the world who share their sense of conviction and open-mindedness, ready to build relationships with artists and audiences of all generations and backgrounds based on a deep trust in themselves and each other. “Please,” sings Sadam on “Taghadart,” “safeguard my trust, from now until the end of time.”

Acoustic Lounge

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT JASON DEVORE (AUTHORITY ZERO)

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When Jason DeVore isn’t biting off the lyrics to a ska-punk anthem for his day job as founding vocalist of Mesa, AZ’s hometown heroes Authority Zero, you most likely will find him strumming his acoustic guitar and uncharacteristically wearing his heart on his sleeve.

Since 2006, when he self-released his first solo album, Conviction (The Smokehouse Sessions), DeVore has been working on a five-part epic that now includes 2011’s Conviction 2 (The Crooked Path) and last year’s Conviction, Volume III: The Road to Clarity.  Quite distinct from his work with AZ, the new music has mutated into a largely acoustic,  roots-oriented sound that harks back to his mother’s youngest brother, Uncle Don, who would tour fairgrounds impersonating the likes of Willie Nelson and Elvis Presley.

“The first two albums were just me wanting to experiment with different instruments, to kind of see what would happen,” says Jason about the genesis of his solo work, which began, as his songwriting usually does, composing a number of songs on acoustic guitar that just didn’t feel right for the band. “Rather than try to make them something they weren’t, I recorded them because they had such an honest feeling to them. It gave me a chance to broaden my horizons with other sounds I was interested in exploring.”

The latest release, Conviction, Volume III, offers the full flowering of his artistic vision, a set of songs like “I Hate To Say I Told You So” and “Black and Blue” that plumbs a personal side of DeVore he keeps hidden behind the abstract, rallying cries of his songs in Authority Zero.

“These are personal, self-revealing songs,” he explains. “I put my heart on my sleeve with these lyrics, and that’s hard to do sometimes. These songs are straight to the point. There’s not a lot of confusion about what or who I’m singing about.” An autobiographical song like “Young and Numb,” about his own adventures in a certain band, the closing song on Conviction 2, is typical of DeVore’s intention.

Even with his packed Authority Zero touring schedule, DeVore manages to make time for his solo work.  His latest project, The Deadly’s, a side project with his Dublin drummer friend Keith Walker, is a Celtic-Irish pub/punk band with influences like Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphys and The Pogues’ Shane MacGowan, much like The Bollox, his similar band which crashed and burned after initial success. Jason has also toured his solo material with periodic Le Tour DeVore, hitting the road in a van with his wife’s brother Russ Baum and Less Than Jake’s Chris DeMakes to play around the country.

“We have people standing on tables, drinking Guinness and Jameson, spilling it all over the place,” says of his gigs with The Bollox and now The Deadly’s.

In the meantime, as he waits for the current Covid-19 crisis to let up so he can get back on the road, DeVore remains busy writing with his guys in Authority Zero and composing new solo material, while hosting his own YouTube series, “Story Time,” in which he explains the motivations behind his songs like “Black and Blue,” or simply reads a children’s book such as Walter the Farting Dog.

“I’m blessed to be able to do this for a living,” says Jason. “I don’t think I ever want to stop.”

For Jason DeVore, life begins at 40.

 

ABOUT GABO (FAYUCA)

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ABOUT ZACH (ZEECEEKEELY)

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ABOUT DESERT FISH UNPLUGGED

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ABOUT RANDY VEGA

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Prof’s Big League Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

 FACEBOOK  | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | LISTEN

For Prof, the worlds of fact and fiction are often intertwined, as he balances on a fine line between real-life experiences and yet unfulfilled fantasies. The Minneapolis rapper has made a robust career for himself by crafting memorable songs about everything from heartache to arson to wild adventures with women. These terrific tales and his dynamic stage show have led to concerts and tours across the country, and have exposed him to life-altering experiences. They also planted a seed.

An accomplished and open-minded artist, Prof first started playing with a concept in one of his rhyme books years ago. As the idea germinated, the Minnesota artist decided to apply it to his life and his neighborhood while tapping into his vast imagination and his remarkable life. The result is Prof’s new album on Stophouse Music Group, Powderhorn Suites 11/13, a wide-ranging artistic tour de force that places him among rap’s most gifted auteurs. “There’s so many different things happening in a hotel at one time,” Prof explains. “Somebody’s doing drugs. Somebody’s having sex. There’s a fight over there. Someone’s trying to get some rest over here. There’s just so much going on in one place.”

As an artist and a man who is fueled by overcoming his past, standing in his strength, and pushing himself creatively, Prof has plenty of inspiration to draw from as he moves into the next phases of his career and his life.