Meat Puppets & Mudhoney

*COVID RESTRICTIONS*
Per artist request, all attendees must be vaccinated to attend this show.

ABOUT The Meat Puppets

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The Meat Puppets’ story begins with three kids, enamored of music and immersed in the psychedelic drug culture of Arizona in the ’70s, who find their way to punk rock and painstakingly become one of the most important bands of the American underground.

At their induction into the Arizona Music & Entertainment Hall of Fame in 2017, the original lineup of the Meat Puppets – brothers Cris and Curt Kirkwood and drummer Derrick Bostrom – joined together onstage for the first time in over two decades.

Since the band debuted in the early ’80s, Curt Kirkwood has continually proven himself to be among the most brilliant songwriters of his generation. Time after time, album after album, he’s demonstrated an extraordinary ability to draw upon various roots and rock styles en route to a unique new vision of what the Meat Puppets can be. His latest contributions, especially songs such as “Warranty,” “On,” “Nine Pins,” “Outflow” could be forgotten gems from Nashville, Bakersfield and Laurel Canyon.

“The band has been a really, really deep font of creativity,” Derrick said. “Love it or hate it, hit or miss, Curt is just prodigious. They are still living the rock lifestyle; they’re not doing it by half measures. They stayed on the road. These guys are uncompromising. I consider the Meat Puppets to be a national treasure.”

 

ABOUT Mudhoney

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Nirvana may have been the band that put an entire generation in flannel, and Pearl Jam and Soundgarden both sold a lot more records, but Mudhoney were truly the band that made the ’90s grunge rock movement possible. Mudhoney were the first real success story for Sub Pop Records; their music laid the groundwork for the movement that would (briefly) make Seattle, Washington, the new capital of the rock & roll universe. They took the sweat-soaked and beer-fueled mixture of heavy metal muscle, punk attitude, and garage rock primitivism that would become known as “grunge” to the hipster audience for the first time with early releases like 1988’s Superfuzz Bigmuff and 1989’s Mudhoney, and those fans would in turn sell it to a mass audience ready for something new. Mudhoney never scored the big payday some of their old running buddies did, though they did land a major-label deal that produced several strong albums, especially 1995’s My Brother the Cow and 1998’s Tomorrow Hit Today. Their importance on the Seattle scene cannot be underestimated, and their body of work — big, loud, purposefully sloppy, a little bit menacing, and even more funny — has stood the test of time better than their well-known colleagues. And they continued to produce strong, relevant music into their third decade on 2013’s Vanishing Point and 2018’s Digital Garbage.

Mudhoney’s timeline begins in 1980, when teenaged Mark McLaughlin (who would soon adopt the punk handle Mark Arm) formed the band Mr. Epp and the Calculations with some high school friends from the Seattle suburb of Bellevue, none of whom actually knew how to play at the time. More interested in goofing off, breaking things, and posting flyers for shows that were never scheduled than actually making music, Mr. Epp didn’t get around to playing a show until late 1981, opening for a band called Student Nurse. Despite their legendary ineptitude (they were described as “the worst band in the world” on more than one occasion), Mr. Epp began to develop a following, and released a 7″ EP in 1982. In 1983, in a bid to sound more like a real band, the group added a second guitarist, Steve Turner, who had previously played in a garage band called the Ducky Boys. That same year they released their Live as All Get Out cassette, but things began to peter out for the group, and they played their final show in February 1984. In 1981, Arm and Turner, who’d become fast friends, also began playing in another joke-punk band, the Limp Richerds, and briefly placed their focus on that group until the Richerds also broke up near the end of 1984.

Eager to start playing again, Arm and Turner teamed up with drummer Alex Vincent, who had played with Turner in a short-lived band called Spluii Numa, and bassist Jeff Ament, who had recently arrived in the Northwest from Montana. When Arm decided he wanted to put down his guitar and concentrate on vocals, Turner asked former Ducky Boys guitarist Stone Gossard to join the group, and Green River was born. Along with fellow Washingtonians the MelvinsGreen River were pioneers of a new Northwest rock sound, merging the snot-nosed sneer of punk with the minor-key thud of heavy metal. It didn’t take long for Green River to get noticed on the Seattle rock scene, and in 1985 the band released its first EP, Come on Down. By the time the record hit the streets, Turner had left the band to return to college (he was also growing disenchanted with the harder rock direction the band was following), and with new guitarist Bruce Fairweather, the band set out on a nationwide tour that was little short of disastrous, in large part because a delay in the record’s release had the band supporting an album that hadn’t come out yet. The band survived to make a second EP, Dry as a Bone, for a new Seattle label, Sub Pop Records, in 1987 — but by the time its first full-length album, Rehab Doll, was released in the summer of 1988, tensions between members of the band caused Green River to split up. Ament and Gossard formed a new band called Mother Love Bone; Fairweather joined Love Battery, and Vincent went to law school.

Arm and Turner, meanwhile, had formed a side project while in Green River called the Thrown Ups, featuring graphic artist Ed Fotheringham on vocals. Essentially a more extreme example of the sort of goofy onslaught Arm and Turner had let loose with Mr. Epp, the Thrown Ups brought the two friends back together again, but Turner expressed a desire to form a new band that actually rehearsed songs before playing them in front of an audience. In his spare time, Turner began working up new material with Arm and drummer Dan Peters, who had played in Bundle of Hiss and Feast. Needing a bassist, the three hooked up with Matt Lukin, who had recently left the Melvins shortly before they left Washington for California. Naming themselves Mudhoney after a Russ Meyer film none of them had actually seen, the new foursome took the punk metal formula of Green River and the Melvins, added a dollop of ’60s garage rock swagger and a large portion of Fun House-era Stooges, and ran it all through the cheap stomp boxes Arm and Turner so cherished. Turner initially expected the band to last about six months.

In 1988, Sub Pop released the band’s first single, “Sweet Young Thing Ain’t Sweet No More” b/w “Touch Me I’m Sick,” with the EP Superfuzz Bigmuff following a few months later. The timing proved fortuitous. The indie circuit success of the Replacements and Big Black had created a demand at college radio and the underground club circuit for harder and heavier bands, and Sub Pop‘s homegrown but earnest media blitz was helping to make “the Seattle Sound” — soon to be dubbed “grunge” — the next big thing, with Mudhoney the chief beneficiary. While the band’s first American tour was nothing to write home about, the Sub Pop hype machine had already begun to take hold overseas, and the band scored a European tour — mostly dates in Germany — in early 1989. A few months later, Sonic Youth, who’d been big fans of Green River, invited Turner and Arm‘s new band to join them for a British tour, and soon Mudhoney found themselves the talk of the U.K. rock press. Superfuzz Bigmuff landed on the British indie charts and stayed there for the better part of a year, and the band wasted no time returning for a headlining tour, complete with massive press coverage and riotous shows. Word of the band’s rep in Europe quickly crossed the pond, and Mudhoney were the new heroes of underground rock by the time their first full-length album, simply called Mudhoney, came out in late 1989.

In the wake of Mudhoney’s success, a number of other Sub Pop acts began making big noise on college radio and the indie club circuit, including SoundgardenTad, the Fluid, and a trio of Melvins fans from Aberdeen, Washington, called Nirvana. However, while Sub Pop was doing a fine job of creating the Next Big Thing, they weren’t making much money at it just yet, and the label’s financial status was one reason Mudhoney’s second full-length album, Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge — which found them upping the garage punk quotient in their formula — didn’t hit stores until 1991. By the end of the year, Mudhoney were shopping for a new label, and they could have hardly chosen a better time; Nirvana had already taken the major-label bait in 1990, and by December of 1991, Nevermind had made them the biggest and most talked-about rock band in America. Soon, seemingly every band in Seattle was being offered a major-label contract, and Mudhoney signed a deal with Reprise/Warner Bros. Their first major-label album, Piece of Cake, made it clear that Mudhoney’s new corporate sponsorship wasn’t going to change their musical approach — but their presence on a major label seemed to alienate old fans, while the mass audience that had embraced NirvanaSoundgarden, and Pearl Jam (featuring Arm and Turner‘s old Green River bandmates Stone Gossard and Jeff Ament) found Mudhoney’s work too eccentric for comfort. While Mudhoney remained a potent live draw, their record sales during their tenure with Reprise were disappointing, though they recorded two of their finest albums for the label: My Brother the Cow and Tomorrow Hit Today.

In 1999, after an extensive tour supporting Tomorrow Hit Today, Reprise announced that they had dropped Mudhoney from their roster, and shortly after that, the band announced that Matt Lukin had turned in his resignation, citing his dislike of touring. With the release of March to Fuzz, a comprehensive career-retrospective, many observers assumed that Mudhoney had called it a day, but in 2001 the band began playing a few live dates around the Northwest, with Steve Dukich (formerly with Steel Wool) sitting in on bass. The shows went well enough that Mudhoney decided to take another stab at their career, and Guy Maddison — who’d been a member of Bloodloss, one of Arm‘s many part-time bands — signed on as Mudhoney’s new official bassist. Arm and Turner also found time to record and tour with a side project, the garage-blues band Monkeywrench. When they came back together, they recorded Since We’ve Become Translucent and released it in the summer of 2002. The angry political and social commentary Under a Billion Suns appeared in 2006, followed by the deliberately raw return to their aggressive roots The Lucky Ones in 2008.

In the years following The Lucky Ones, Mudhoney toured regularly, with one of the highlights being a showcase of the entire Superfuzz Bigmuff album at the 2010 All Tomorrows Parties in New York. All this was preparation for a 25th Anniversary blow-out in 2013, when the band released their ninth studio album, Vanishing Point, and a home video release of the documentary I’m Now, which was screened at various film festivals in 2012. In 2018, Mudhoney celebrated their 30th birthday with the release of their first authorized, unlimited-edition live album, LiE (aka Live in Europe), recorded during a run of shows in 2016. The following year, the band got to work writing and recording their tenth LP. The lean and angry Digital Garbage arrived in September 2018. A year later, an EP compiled from Digital Garbage outtakes, Morning in America, was released as the band set out on a North American tour. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Steve Hofstetter

 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Hofstetter, who has a whopping 185 million views on YouTube, is also the host of Finding Babe Ruth on FS1. His book (Ginger Kid) is a top 5 pick on Amazon and debuted at number one in its category. Hofstetter was the host and executive producer of season one of Laughs (FOX) and he has been on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson and E! True Hollywood Story, Comics Unleashed, Comedy All-Stars, Quite Frankly, White Boyz in the Hood, Countdown, and more. He’s been in four movies, and he has had two top 20 comedy albums (including one that hit number 1 on iTunes comedy charts). He is a former columnist for Sports Illustrated and the NHL, and has also written for Maxim and the New York Times, among others.

Earth’s Healing Presents: LIVE IN TUCSON w/ Special Guests @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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Earth’s Healing Presents: LIVE IN TUCSON

featuring Winnie Versace, MTM & Friends, and Special Guests. Vendors/Sponsors/Entertainment/Food

LIVE IN TUCSON is an event that has been in the making for the past 6 months.
Tucson is no stranger to unique talent and incredible entertainment. Since the pandemic, we have managed to thrive as an artistic community of collective minds with a singular
goal: success. Troubling times have always been an inspiration to hip hop since the beginning of its popularity, they continue to inspire us daily to
become better fathers, mothers, daughters, and sons. Therefore, we are excited to
announce that Earth’s Healing and Winnie Versace have teamed up to bring our
community together for a night of celebration and enjoyment.

The Bennu @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE BENNU

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Blending elements of psychedelic, progressive, and electronic rock with jazz sensibilities, infectious dance beats and group improvisation, The Bennu delivers dynamic live shows that are unique with each performance. The musical tapestry is woven together with captivating female lead vocals and inspired songwriting. With brilliantly accessible musicianship, The Bennu takes its audience on a journey of mystical sonic and melodic exploration.

 

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ABOUT THE LEGION OF MARIO

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Legion of Mario is a live and improvisational band that plays the music of the Jerry Garcia Band, Jerry Garcia and the Legion of Mary in their own soulful style. They play all of Jerry’s originals as well as the covers that he played from Dylan, The Band, Motown and more. Mario Saravia channels the guitar and vocals of Jerry. Doc Holladay brings his Hammond B-3 to life in a way that would make Melvin proud. Mark Ryan (bass guitar) and Andy Briefer (drums) hold down the groove and keep the dance floor moving.

Hail the Sun

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT HAIL THE SUN

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Hail the Sun isn’t anything. They just are.

They continue to push what is known as post-hardcore into realms that both your metal friend will love, and you can show your grandma. The band has been actively writing and touring together for over a decade. This comes out clearly when listening to their music, and this is no exception with their newest album New Age Filth. I could go on to list what inspires them, their hardships, their influences, etc. But, why? There is absolutely nothing that could be said to fully reign in what the band is. So you just have to listen. No, you need to listen. Chances are that once you do, you will relate to the thousands of followers who not only appreciate the music in the most loyal way, but they appreciate the entity that is Hail the Sun. The lifestyle that is Hail the Sun.

The moments that are Hail the Sun.

 

 

ABOUT STRAWBERRY GIRLS

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Strawberry Girls is an instrumental trio from Salinas, California featuring Ben Rosett (Eternity Forever), Zac Garren (formerly of Dance Gavin Dance) and Ian Jennings. They’ve toured with bands such as CHON, Polyphia, Dance Gavin Dance, Intervals, The Contortionist, and mewithoutYou. 
 They’re currently finishing their 5th full length album, and have released “Honeydew” and “Crazy” featuring Andrés. 
 “The band is aptly named after 80’s post-punk song “Christine”, by Siouxsie & the Banshees, which was written about the real life patient Christine Sizemore who was portrayed by Joanne Woodward in the 1957 movie The Three Faces of Eve. In the movie, Christine interweaves three distinct personalities, similar to how Strawberry Girls blends genres. It’s a fitting name to a band that has effortlessly intertwined dynamic changes in their songs for four LP’s and will continue to do so on their next one.”

 

ABOUT ANDRES

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ABOUT AMARIONETTE

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Amarionette is a NÜ Funk/Rock band from Las Vegas, NV that formed in 2010. Over the last several years they have embarked on numerous tours with national acts such as Kurt Travis, Strawberry Girls, Eidola, Andrés, etc. In 2018, Amarionette parted ways with former lead vocalist Quin White, and have released two EP’s with new lead vocalist, Issy Berry titled AMVRI and Evolution. 
 New full length album “Sunset On This Generation” out now.

Lisa Morales

ABOUT THE ARTIST

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On her upcoming five-song EP Rain in the Desert, Lisa Morales once again affirms her stature as a world-class singer-songwriter, with a distinctive perspective and a remarkable capacity for looking both inward and outward. The Texas-based artist draws deeply resonant insights from her own experiences navigating the storms of life and making sense of the complex landscape of relationships.

Rain in the Desert maintains the high standard of emotional forthrightness that Morales established in her prior solo efforts Beautiful Mistake and Luna Negra and the Daughter of the Sun. Prior to going solo, she recorded four acclaimed albums with Sisters Morales, the beloved sibling duo in which she partnered with her sister Roberta, who passed away from cancer in August 2021.

Such new Morales compositions as “Freedom,” “Reach Out,” “Desperately,” “Rain in the Desert” and “Flyin’ and Cryin’,” consistently cut to the heart of her experiences as a woman, mother, and daughter.

Rain in the Desert was produced by singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist David Garza and features bassist Tim Lefebvre, keyboardist Rachel Eckroth and drummer Beth Goodfellow. The EP also features key contributions from Rodney Crowell, who co-wrote and sings co-lead vocal on the heart-tugging “Flyin’ and Cryin,” which also features Los Lobos’ David Hidalgo on accordion; and Santana co-founder Gregg Rolie, who plays organ and provides backing vocals on the rousing, and the timely topical “Freedom.”

Your Money’s Worth

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

FACEBOOK  | YOUTUBE

 

The driving force behind rock n roll cover band ‘Your Money’s Worth’ is a passion for music and fun! It’s the music of the classic bands of the 60’s and 70’s that they enjoy playing that gets people out of their chairs and dancing to the groove. From the Stones and Beatles to Clapton and Eagles, Your Money’s Worth is ready to share their musical journey with you.

Kishi Bashi – 151A 10th Anniversary Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

WEBSITE | FACEBOOK  | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | LISTEN

They say that you spend your entire life writing your first album, piecing every formative moment, scribbled turn of phrase, and thematic epiphany into a fantastical collage. Multi-instrumentalist K. Ishibashi (aka Kishi Bashi) disproves that old adage. The title of Kishi Bashi’s 2011 debut album, 151a, is a riff on the Japanese phrase “ichi-go ichi-e,” roughly translating to “one time, one place.” That’s exactly what this debut is: A singular time, an inimitable place, a launchpad for bigger and better things to come.

“It’s a play on words that translates as a performance aesthetic of having a unique performance in time, with imperfections, and enjoying it while you can,” Ishibashi told NPR at the time of the album’s release. “The saying reminds me to embrace my mistakes and move forward.”

Produced and performed exclusively by Kishi Bashi, 151a is a showcase of singular talent and ambition— and it didn’t go unnoticed by fans or peers. Along with launching Kishi Bashi’s career as a soloist, this earnest debut made him one of indie music’s most in-demand violinists. He was no longer relegated to side stage as a collaborator of Regina Spektor, Sondre Lerche, of Montreal, and more—the Kishi Bashi name could endure with its own merit.

As deeply personal as 151a undoubtedly is, the record was animated by a deep and enduring partnership. Following Kishi Bashi’s collaboration with of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes for the watershed art-pop album Paralytic Stalks, his worldview and artistic approach was transformed for the better. Strict habits hung loose, sonic palettes bled and broadened, and a one-man orchestra sprouted from a foundation of string loops.

From the deconstructed Beach Boys-esque doo-wop of “Wonder Woman” to the menacing marriage of Eastern Hues and Western operatics of “Beat the Bright out of Me,” 151a a mediation between opposing drives, offering possible reconciliation but never promising it. The album’s emotional wellspring, “I Am The Antichrist To You” was reimagined in 2021 when it was featured on the animated sci-fi sitcom Rick and Morty, introducing Kishi Bashi to a new generation of awestruck fans.

Kishi Bashi also uses 151a as a vehicle to explore his cultural background. Using Japanese refrains as a compositional and textural device (the polyrhythmic grandeur of “Bright Whites”; the gleeful surrealism of “It All Began With a Burst”), Kishi Bashi celebrates his heritage with earnestness. Japanese phrases and couplets are sung as the response to Kishi Bashi’s resplendent calls, offering listeners a conversation that dovetails with the album’s themes of love, sentimentality, and self-discovery.

Today, the “one time” and “one place” that 151a inhabited seems further than ever, almost broaching celestial realms of time and space. But, rest assured, with each listen, the world that Kishi Bashi built springs back to life. The world of 151a never left—it was just waiting to be rediscovered.

Prof’s Big League Tour @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

 FACEBOOK  | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | LISTEN

For Prof, the worlds of fact and fiction are often intertwined, as he balances on a fine line between real-life experiences and yet unfulfilled fantasies. The Minneapolis rapper has made a robust career for himself by crafting memorable songs about everything from heartache to arson to wild adventures with women. These terrific tales and his dynamic stage show have led to concerts and tours across the country, and have exposed him to life-altering experiences. They also planted a seed.

An accomplished and open-minded artist, Prof first started playing with a concept in one of his rhyme books years ago. As the idea germinated, the Minnesota artist decided to apply it to his life and his neighborhood while tapping into his vast imagination and his remarkable life. The result is Prof’s new album on Stophouse Music Group, Powderhorn Suites 11/13, a wide-ranging artistic tour de force that places him among rap’s most gifted auteurs. “There’s so many different things happening in a hotel at one time,” Prof explains. “Somebody’s doing drugs. Somebody’s having sex. There’s a fight over there. Someone’s trying to get some rest over here. There’s just so much going on in one place.”

As an artist and a man who is fueled by overcoming his past, standing in his strength, and pushing himself creatively, Prof has plenty of inspiration to draw from as he moves into the next phases of his career and his life.